Raising Resilient Kids

bouncebackOne big lesson we are all learning during these difficult times is resiliency. Resiliency is the ability to bounce back from setbacks, failures, stress or adversity. Resilient kids are more likely to take healthy risks because they aren’t afraid of falling short of expectations. You can help your children to be more resilient by trying to stay positive, parenting with clear discipline, and allowing them to stumble – and being there to help them up if they fall.

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Read more:

Helping Kids Cope with Life’s Curveballs” – Kaiser Permanente.org

Building Resilience in Children” – HealthyChildren.org

9 Activities to Build Grit and Resilience in Children” – BigLifeJournal.org

Some tips:

  • Parent with positivity. Resilience grows out of the confidence that comes from being raised with unconditional love. You can create this in part through positive parenting, which focuses on guiding kids toward positive behaviors rather than punishing them when they fall short.
  • Parent with clear discipline. Teaching our kids how to behave well gives them strength and security. Children thrive when they know what’s expected of them — and what the consequences are if they don’t behave.
  • Create a circle of support. Kids feel most resilient when they are supported and loved. Make their circle of support as wide as you can by encouraging connections with family and friends. Get to know your neighbors and the parents of your kids’ friends by taking walks or sharing meals together. This lets kids know they have a safety net — and allows them to be strong when facing challenges.
  • Let them stumble. Allow children to solve their own problems as often as you can. Did they forget their homework again? Have they hurt a friend’s feelings? Let them come up with solutions on their own. This gives them the strength that comes from knowing they can solve problems and handle what life throws at them.
  • Volunteer as a family. Giving back to the community teaches children that there’s nothing wrong with accepting help. It allows them to ask for help from others if they need it.
  • Take care of yourself. Your stress level affects your child too, so be sure to care of yourself by sleeping, eating, and exercising. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, talk with friends, family, or a counselor. This benefits both you and your child.

Books about Resiliency:

 

 

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